Andrew McCallum (1821-1902)

Andrew McCallum (1821-1902). McCallum was born in Nottingham but of Scottish Highland background. He was son of an employee at the William Gibson & Sons manufactory there. An interest in drawing was encouraged by Thomas Bailey who allowed him to copy pictures in his collection. On his 21st birthday, McCallum left home and maintained himself by teaching. Aged twenty-two he became a student in the recently founded Government School of Art in Nottingham. He exhibited at The British Institution in 1849. About this time he became a student at the Government School of Design at Somerset House. In 1850 he first exhibited at the Royal Academy. From that year till 1852 he was assistant master at the Manchester School of Art and from 1852 to 1854 he was headmaster of the School of Art at Stourbridge. In 1854 McCallum went to Italy with a travelling studentship. Part of his time was spent on mural decorations; returning to England in 1857, he decorated the western exterior of the Sheepshanks Gallery at the South Kensington Museum with panels. He then concentrated on landscape, with subjects at Burnham Beeches and Windsor Forest. Towards the end of 1861 McCallum painted at Fontainebleau. In 1864 he worked in Switzerland and on the River Rhine. In  1866 he was in Italy; in the winter of 1866–7 he was in the neighbourhood of Paris. Between 1870 and 1875 he paid several visits to Egypt. About 1875 he was commissioned by Queen Victorian to paint five views near Balmoral He sometimes lectured on art subjects. McCallum died on 22 January 1902 at 5 The Studios, Holland Park Road London and had lived in the neighbourhood.